Tag Archives: monogamy

Economic growth is good for monogamous marriage (and vice-a-versa)

One of the most interesting of the (ridiculously) long list of documents my daughter had to provide in order to work here in France was a letter stating that she would not enter a polygamous marriage. Polygamy is illegal in France, so you might think this pledge is as redundant as pledging not to become […]

Why didn’t Jane Austen Write “Pride and Polygyny”?

IT is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife. So wrote Jane Austen in the opening line of her novel Pride and Prejudice.

The Death of Monogamy, Greatly Exaggerated

USA Today posted an article on Saturday with the headline “Young Couples Often Disagree about Monogamy” in which they assert: Many young American couples can’t agree on whether they’ve decided to have sex only with each other, a new study shows. Oregon State University researchers analyzed data collected from 434 heterosexual married and non-married couples, aged 18 […]

A Link Between Alcohol Consumption and Monogamy

I am not kidding when I say this, if I had to live in a household in which my husband had more than one wife, there would have to be alcohol involved; at bare minimum a cocktail hour, but preferably an open bar. The reality is, of course, that if you are in a polygynous […]

Education May Explain Why Rich Nations Prefer Monogamy

On Thursday we started talking about the economics of monogamy and polygyny and I told you one theory that might explain the puzzle as to why, over time, in rich countries monogamy has prevailed over polygyny despite high levels of inequality in those countries.  George Bernard Shaw in his 1903 “Maxims for Revolutionists” probably summarized that argument […]

The Economics of Monogamy and Polygyny

Imagine you took all the men in a particular society and lined them up according to their level of income. On one side of the line you would have the extremely wealthy, the Bill Gateses of the group, and on the other side you would have the extremely poor—perhaps those who live in cardboard boxes. […]